Mindless Self Indulgance

The most significant difference between the millennial generation and the age prior is our seemingly needless penchant for mindless self-indulgence. What is the goal in life? To the latchkey generation, preceding the baby-boomers, the point of being was to merely get a job, get married, buy a house, have children, and die. To an entire generation of people; this was it. The apex of life was to secure a future for yourself and your family. However, what is the point of living to millennial? If I had to answer that myself, I wouldn’t agree with the latchkeys at all. Yes, having a roof over your head would be nice, and I’m sure having children is as rewarding as parents make it out to be. But I can’t help but feel like there’s something more; something seemingly attainable, but barely out of reach. As if, the meaning was behind a glass pane, and I were on the other side.

I cannot speak for multiple decades of other people, but what I can say is that it’s an almost lonely feeling that we all feel together. With the incredible rise in technology over the past twenty years, it’s as if we collectively grew up with technology, and as a side effect, we’ve grown up with each other. If you’re reading this post, you’ve been there. You’ve spent countless hours on image boards, on gaming forums, on Reddit. You’ve interacted with thousands of people in weeks, through the fleeting sentimentality that is the Internet. Some of you may have made lasting friendships through the Internet. Some of you have added a friend to an instant messenger only to never contact them ever again. Sometimes, it feels like this is what life is for; to connect with other people, through a medium experimented with only the people alive at this very moment. One hundred and one billion people have roamed this Earth, and only seven billion do now. And out of those people, just three billion use the Internet. And of those, only a handful use the same sites you do. And of those, only a few grains of sand on an endless beach has ever spoken your name. But these people aren’t real. You’re looking through a window, communicating through it, and making connections with the people behind it, but they could leave at any time, and you would be none the wiser. It’s… a lonely feeling. Our generation, the generation growing up with technology, replaces social interaction with mindless self-indulgence.